Tag Archives: Cloud

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

I believe there is a hidden strategy behind Oracle's product release schedule: every time I'm either on holidays or in a business trip full of appointments a new version of Oracle Analytics Cloud is published with a huge set of new features!

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

OAC 18.3.3 went live last week and contains a big set of enhancements, some of which were already described at Kscope18 during the Sunday Symposium. New features are appearing in almost all the areas covered by OAC, from Data Preparation to the main Data Flows, new Visualization types, new security and configuration options and BIP and Essbase enhancements. Let's have a look at what's there!

Data Preparation

A recurring theme in Europe since last year is GDPR, the General Data Protection Regulation which aims at protecting data and privacy of all European citizens. This is very important in our landscape since we "play" with data on daily basis and we should be aware of what data we can use and how.
Luckily for us now OAC helps to address GDPR with the Data Preparation Recommendations step: every time a dataset is added, each column is profiled and a list of recommended transformations is suggested to the user. Please note that Data Preparation Recommendations is only suggesting changes to the dataset, thus can't be considered the global solution to GDPR compliance.
The suggestion may include:

  • Complete or partial obfuscation of the data: useful when dealing with security/user sensitive data
  • Data Enrichment based on the column data can include:
    • Demographical information based on names
    • Geographical information based on locations, zip codes

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

Each of the suggestion applied to the dataset is stored in a data preparation script that can easily be reapplied if the data is updated.

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

Data Flows

Data Flows is the "mini-ETL" component within OAC which allows transformations, joins, aggregations, filtering, binning, machine learning model training and storing the artifacts either locally or in a database or Essbase cube.
The dataflows however had some limitations, the first one was that they had to be run manually by the user. With OAC 18.3.3 now there is the option to schedule Data Flows more or less like we were used to when scheduling Agents back in OBIEE.

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

Another limitation was related to the creation of a unique Data-set per Data Flow which has been solved with the introduction of the Branch node which allows a single Data Flow to produce multiple data-sets, very useful when the same set of source data and transformations needs to be used to produce various data-sets.

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

Two other new features have been introduced to make data-flows more reusable: Parametrized Sources and Outputs and Incremental Processing.
The Parametrized Sources and Outputs allows to select the data-flow source or target during runtime, allowing, for example, to create a specific and different dataset for today's load.

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

The Incremental Processing, as the name says, is a way to run Data Flows only on top of the data added since the last run (Incremental loads in ETL terms). In order to have a data flow working with incremental loads we need to:

  • Define in the source dataset which is the key column that can be used to indicate new data (e.g. CUSTOMER_KEY or ORDER_DATE) since the last run
  • When including the dataset in a Data Flow enable the execution of the Data Flow with only the new data
  • In the target dataset define if the Incremental Processing replaces existing data or appends data.

Please note that the Incremental Load is available only when using Database Sources.

Another important improvement is the Function Shipping when Data Flows are used with Big Data Cloud: If the source datasets are coming from BDC and the results are stored in BDC, all the transformations like joining, adding calculation columns and filtering are shipped to BDC as well, meaning there is no additional load happening on OAC for the Data Flow.

Lastly there is a new Properties Inspector feature in Data Flow allowing to check the properties like name and description as well as accessing and modifying the scheduling of the related flow.

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

Data Replication

Now is possible to use OAC to replicate data from a source system like Oracle's Fusion Apps, Talend or Eloqua directly into Big Data Cloud, Database Cloud or Data Warehouse Cloud. This function is extremely useful since allows decoupling the queries generated by the analytical tools from the source systems.
As expected the user can select which objects to replicate, the filters to apply, the destination tables and columns, and the load type between Full or Incremental.

Project Creation

New visualization capabilities have been added which include:

  • Grid HeatMap
  • Correlation Matrix
  • Discrete Shapes
  • 100% Stacked Bars and Area Charts

In the Map views, Multiple Map Layers can now be added as well as Density and Metric based HeatMaps, all on top of new background maps including Baidu and Google.

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

Tooltips are now supported in all visualizations, allowing the end user to add measure columns which will be shown when over a section of any graph.

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

The Explain feature is now available on metrics and not only on attributes and has been enhanced: a new anomaly detection algorithm identifies anomalies in combinations of columns working in the background in asynchronous mode, allowing the anomalies to be pushed as soon as they are found.

A new feature that many developers will appreciate is the AutoSave: we are all used to autosave when using google docs, the same applies to OAC, a project is saved automatically at every change. Of course this feature can be turn off if necessary.
Another very interesting addition is the Copy Data to Clipboard: with a right click on any graph, an option to save the underline data to clipboard is available. The data can then natively be pasted in Excel.

Did you create a new dataset and you want to repoint your existing project to it? Now with Dataset replacement it's just few clicks away: you need only to select the new dataset and re-map all the columns used in your current project!

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

Data Management

The datasets/dataflows/project methodology is typical of what Gartner defined as Mode 2 analytics: analysis done by a business user whitout any involvement from the IT. The step sometimes missing or hard to be performed in self-service tools is the publishing: once a certain dataset is consistent and ready to be shared, it's rather difficult to open it to a larger audience within the same toolset.
New OAC administrative options have been addressing this problem: a dataset Certification by an administrator allows a certain dataset to be queried via Ask and DayByDay by other users. There is also a dataset Permissions tab allowing the definition of Full Control, Edit or Read Only access at user or role level. This is the way of bringing the self service dataset back to corporate visibility.

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

A Search tab allows a fine control over the indexing of a certain dataset used by Ask and DayByDay. There are now options to select when then indexing is executed as well as which columns to index and how (by column name and value or by column name only).

OAC 18.3.3: New Features

BIP and Essbase

BI Publisher was added to OAC in the previous version, now includes new features like a tighter integration with the datasets which can be used as datasources or features like email delivery read receipt notification and compressed output and password protection that were already available on the on-premises version.
There is also a new set of features for Essbase including new UI, REST APIs, and, very important security wise, all the external communications (like Smartview) are now over HTTPS.
For a detailed list of new features check this link

Conclusion

OAC 18.3.3 includes an incredible amount of new features which enable the whole analytics story: from self-service data discovery to corporate dashboarding and pixel-perfect formatting, all within the same tool and shared security settings. Options like the parametrized and incremental Data Flows allows content reusability and enhance the overall platform performances reducing the load on source systems.
If you are looking into OAC and want to know more don't hesitate to contact us

Trying out the Oracle Cloud Platform

One of the great things of working with Oracle is the possibility to try things out………., for free. Yes, some things at Oracle are indeed free 😃!! There are various places where you can download Oracle (related) software / scripts / examples / etc., so you can try things out. You should create an account … Continue reading "Trying out the Oracle Cloud Platform"

OAC: Essbase – Incremental Loads / Automation

I recently detailed data load possibilities with the tools provided with Essbase under OAC here. Whilst all very usable, my thoughts turned to systems that I have worked on and how the loads currently work, which led to how you might perform incremental and / or automated loads for OAC Essbase.

A few background points:

  • The OAC front end and EssCS command line tools contain a ‘clear’ option for data, but both are full data clears – there does not seem to be a partial or specifiable ‘clear’ available.
  • The OAC front end and EssCS command line tools contain a ‘file upload’ function for (amongst other things) data, rules, and MAXL (msh) script files. Whilst the front-end operation has the ability to overwrite existing files, the EssCS Upload facility (which would be used when trying to script a load) seemingly does not – if an attempt is made to upload a file that already exists, an error is shown.
  • The OAC ‘Job’ facility enables a data load to be conducted with a rules file; the EssCS Dataload function (which would be used when trying to script a load) seemingly does not.
  • MAXL still exists in OAC, so it is possible to operate at Essbase ‘command level’

Whilst the tools that are in place all work well and are fine for migration or other manual / adhoc activity, I am not sure what the intended practice might be around some ‘real world’ use cases: a couple of things that spring to mind are

  • Incremental loads
  • Scheduled loads
  • Large ASO loads (using buffers)

Incremental Loads

It is arguably possible to perform an incremental load in that

  • A rules file can be crafted in on-prem and uploaded to OAC (along with a partial datafile)
  • Loads appear to be conducted in overwrite mode, meaning changed and new records will be handled ok

It is possible that (eg) a ‘current month’ data file could be loaded and reloaded to form an incremental load of sorts. The problem here will come if data is deleted for a particular member combination in the source from one day to the next – with no partial clear (eg, of current month data) seemingly possible, there is no way of clearing redundant values (at least for an ASO cube…for a BSO load, the ‘Clear combinations’ functionality of the load rules file can be used…although that has not yet been tested on this version).

So in the case of an ASO cube, the only option using available tools would be to ensure that ‘contra’ records are added to the incremental load file. This is not ideal, as it is another process to follow in data preparation, and would also add unnecessary zeros to the cube. For these reasons, I would generally look to effect a partial clear of the ‘slice’ being loaded before proceeding with an incremental the load.

The only way I can see of achieving this under OAC would be to take advantage of the fact that MAXL is available and effect the clear using alter database clear data.

This means that the steps required might be

  • Upload prepared incremental data file (either manually via OAC or via EssCS UploadFiles after having first deleted the existing file)
  • Upload on-prem prepared rules file (either manually via OAC or via EssCS UploadFiles after having first deleted the existing file)
  • Access the OAC server (eg via Putty), start MAXL, and run a command to clear the required slice / merge slices (if necessary)
  • In OAC, create / run a job for the specified data file / rules file

I may have missed something, but I see no obvious way of being able to automate this process with the on-board facilities.

Automating the load process

Along with the points listed above, some other facts to be aware of:

  • It is possible to manually transfer files to OAC using FTP
  • It is possible to amend the cron scheduler for the oracle user in OAC

Even bearing in mind the above, I should caveat this section by saying getting ‘under the hood’ in this way is possibly not supported or recommended, and should only be undertaken at your own risk.

Having said that…

By taking advantage of the availability of FTP and cron, it should be possible to script a solution that can run unattended, for full and incremental loads. Furthermore, data clears (full or partial) can be included in the same process, as could parallel buffer loading for ASO or any other MAXL-controllable process (within the confines of this version of Essbase).

The OAC environment

A quick look around discloses that the /u01/latency directory is roughly the equivalent of the ../user_projects/epmsystem1/EssbaseServer/essbaseserver1 (or equivalent) directory in an on-prem release in that it contains the /app ‘parent’ directory which in turn contains a subdirectory structure for all application and cube artefacts. Examining this directory for ASOSamp.Basic shows that the uploaded dataload.* files are here, along with all other files listed by the Files screen of OAC:

Note that remote connection is via the opc user, but this can be changed to oracle once connected (by using sudo su – oracle).

As oracle, these files can be manually deleted…doing so means they will no longer be found by the EssCS Listfiles command or the Files screen within OAC (once refreshed). If deleted manually, new versions of the files can be re-uploaded via either of the methods detailed above (whilst an overwrite option exists in the OAC Files facility, there seems to be no such option with the EssCS Upload feature…trying to upload a file that already exists results in an error.

All files are owned by the oracle user, with no access rights at all for the opc user that effects a remote connection via FTP.

Automation: Objectives

The objective of this exercise was to come up with a method that, unattended, would:

  • Upload received files (data, rules) to OAC from a local source
  • Put them in the correct OAC directory in a usable format
  • Invoke a process that runs a pre-load process (eg a clear), a load, and (if necessary a post load process)
  • Clear up after itself

Automation: The Process

The first job is to handle the upload of files to OAC. This could be achieved via a psftp script that uploads the entire contents of a nominated local directory:

The EssCSUpload,bat script above (which can, of course be added to a local scheduler so that it runs unattended at appointed times) passes a pre-scripted file to psftp to connect and transfer the files. Note that the opc user is used for the connection, and the files are posted to a custom-created directory, CUSTOM_receive (under the existing /u01/latency). The transferred files are also given a global ‘rw’ attribute to assist with later processing

Now the files are in the OAC environment, control is taken up there.

A shell script (DealWithUploads) is added to the oracle home directory:

This copies all the files in the nominated receiving directory to the actual required location – in this case, the main ASOSamp/Basic directory. Note the use of ‘-p’ with the copy command to ensure that attributes (ie, the global ‘rw’) are retained. Once copied, the files are deleted from the receiving directory so that they are not processed again.

Once the files are copied into place, startMAXL is used to invoke a pre-prepared msh script:

as can be seen, this clears the cube and re-imports from the uploaded file using the uploaded rules file. The clear here is a full reset, but a partial clear (in the case of ASO) can be used here instead if required

As with the ‘local’ half of the method, the DealWithUploads.sh script file can be added to the scheduler on OAC: the existing cron entries are already held in the file /u01/app/oracle/tools/home/oracle/crontab.txt; it is a simple exercise to schedule a call to this new custom script.

A routine such as this would need a good degree of refinement and hardening – the file lists for the transfers should be self-building, passwords need to be encrypted, the MAXL script should only be called if required, the posting locations for files should be content/context sensitive, etc – but in terms of feasibility testing the requirements listed above, it was successful.

This approach places additional directories and files in an environment / structure that could be maintained at any time: it is therefore imperative that some form of code control / release mechanism is employed so that it can be replaced in the event of any unexpected / uncontrollable maintenance taking place on the OAC environment that could invalidate or remove it.

Even once hardened, I think there is a considerable weak spot in this approach in that the rules file seemingly has to be crafted in an on-prem environment and uploaded: as I detailed here, even freshly-uploaded, working rules files error when an attempt is made to verify them. For now, I’ll keep looking for an alternative.

Summary

Whilst a lot of the high-level functionality is in place around data loads, often with multiple methods, I think there are a couple of detailed functionality areas that may currently require workarounds – to my mind, the addition of the ability to select & run an msh format ‘preload’ script when running a dataload Job (eg for clears) would be useful, whilst a fully functional rules file editor strikes me as important. The fact that an FTP connection is available at all is a bonus, but because this is as a non-oracle user, it is not possible to put a file in the correct place directly - the EssCS Upload faciity does this of course, but the seeming absence of an overwrite option or an additional Delete option for EssCS) somewhat limits its usefulness at this point. But can you implement a non attended, scheduled load or incremental load routine ? Sure you can.

OAC: Essbase – Loading Data

After my initial quick pass through Essbase under OAC here, this post looks at the data loading options available in more detail. I used the provided sample database ASOSamp.Basic, which first had to be created, as a working example.

Creating ASOSamp

Under the time-honoured on-prem install of Essbase, the sample applications were available as an install option – supplied data has to be loaded separately, but the applications / cubes themselves are installed as part of the process if the option is selected. This is not quite the same under OAC – some are provided in an easily installable format, but they are not immediately available out-of-the-box.

One of the main methods of cube creation in Essbase under OAC is via the Import of a specifically formatted Excel spreadsheet, and it is via the provision of downloadable pre-built ‘template’ spreadsheets that the sample applications are installed in this version.

After accessing the homepage of Essbase on OAC, download the provided cube creation template – this can be found under the ‘Templates’ button on the home page:

Note that in the case of the sample the ASOSamp.Basic database, the data is not in the main template file – it is held in a separate file. This is different to other examples, such as Sample.Basic, where the data provided is held in a dedicated tab in the main spreadsheet. Download both Aggregate Storage Sample and Aggregate Storage Sample Data:

Return to the home page, and click Import. Choose the spreadsheet downloaded as Aggregate Storage Sample (ASO_Sample.xlsx) and click Deploy and Close.

This will effect all of the detail in the spreadsheet – create the application, create the cube, add dimensions / attribute dimensions and members to the outline, etc:

Loading ASOSamp.Basic

Because the data file is separate from the spreadsheet, the next step is to uploaded this to OAC so that it is available for loading: back on the home page, select the newly-created ASOSamp.Basic (note: not ASOSamp.Sample as with on-prem), and click Files:

In the right-hand window, select the downloaded data file ASOSampleData.txt and click the Upload button:

This will upload the file:

Once the file upload is complete, return to the home page. With the newly-created ASOSamp.Basic still selected, click Jobs:

Choose Data Load as the Job Type, and highlight the required Data File:

Click Execute.

A new line will be added to the Job Monitor:

The current status of the job is shown – in this case, ‘in progress’ – and the screen can be refreshed.

Once complete, the Status field will show the completion state of the job, whilst the Job Details icon on the right-hand side provides more detail – in this case, confirming that 311,795 records were successfully loaded, and 0 rejected:

The success of the load is confirmed by a quick look in Smartview:

Note that a rules file was not selected as part of the job – this makes sense when we look at the data file…

...which is familiar-looking: just what we would expect from a EAS export (MAXL: export database), which can of course just be loaded in a similar no-rules-file way in on prem.

Incidentally, this is different to the on-prem approach to ASOSamp.Sample where a ‘flat’, tab-delimited data file is provided for the sample data, along with a rules file that is required for the load:

...although the end-results are the same:

This ‘standard’ load works in overwrite mode – any new values in the file will be added, but any that exist already will be overwritten: running the load again and refreshing the Smartview report results in the same numbers confirms this.

This can be verified further by running with a changed data file: taking a particular node of data for the Units measure…

One of the constituent data values can be changed in a copy of the data file – in this example, one record (it doesn’t matter which for this purpose) can be increased – in this case, ‘1’ has been increased to ‘103’:

The amended file needs to be saved and uploaded to OAC as outlined above, and the load process repeated, this time using the amended file. After a successful load, the aggregated value on the test Smartview report has increased by the same 102:

Loading flat files

So, how might we load the same sort of flat, tab delimited file of the like supplied as the on-prem ASOSamp.Sample data file ?

As above, files can be uploaded to OAC, so putting the dataload.txt data file from the on-prem release into OAC is straightforward. However, as you’d expect, attempting to run this as a load job without a rules file results in an error.

However, it is possible to run an OAC load with a rules file created in an on-prem version: firstly, upload the rules file (in this case, dataload.rul) in the same way as the data file. When setting up the load job, select the data file as normal, but under Scripts select the rules file required:

The job runs successfully, with the ‘Details’ overlay confirming the successful record count.

As with rules files generated by the Import facility, uploaded rules files can also be edited in text mode:

It would seem logical that changing the dataLoadOptions value at line 215 to a value other than OVERWRITE (eg ADD) might be a quick behavioural change for the load that would be easy to effect. However, making this change resulted in verification errors. Noting that the errors related to invalid dimension names, an attempt was made to verify the actual, unchanged rules file as uploaded…which also resulted in the same verification errors. So somewhat curiously, the uploaded on-prem rules file can be successfully used to load a corresponding data file, but (effectively) can’t be edited or amended.

Loading from Spreadsheet Template

The template spreadsheets used to build applications can also contain one or more data tabs. Unlike the OAC Jobs method or EssCS Dataload, the spreadsheet method gives you the option of a rules file AND the ability to Add (rather than overwrite) data:

Within OAC, this is actioned via the ‘Import’ function on the home page:

Note that we are retaining all data, and have the Load Data box checked. Checks confirm the values in the file are added to those already in the cube.

The data can also be uploaded via the Cube Designer in Excel under Cube Designer / Load Data:

Note that unlike running this method under OAC, the rules file (which was created by the initial import as the Data tab existed in the spreadsheet at that point) has to be selected manually.

Once complete, an offer is made to view the Job Status Viewer (which can also be accessed from Cube Designer / View Jobs):

With further detail for each job also being available:

Use facilities to upload files

Given the ability to upload and run both data and rules files, the next logical step would be to script this for automated running. OAC contains a downloadable utility, the Command Line Tool (aka CLI , EssCS) which is a number of interface tools that can be run locally against an OAC instance of Essbase:

Login / Logout
Calc
Dataload
Dimbuild
Clear
Version
Listfiles
Download
Upload
LcmExport
LcmImport

Running locally, a successful EssCS login effectively starts a session that then remains open for other EssCS commands until the session is closed with a logout command.

The login syntax suggests the inclusion of the port number in the URL, but I had no success with this…although it worked without the port reference:

As above, the connection is made and is verified by the successful running of another command (eg version), but the logout command produced an error. Despite this, the logout appeared successful – no other EssCS commands worked until a login was re-issued.

With EssCS installed and working, the Listfiles and Upload facilities become available. The function of these tools is pretty obvious from the name. Listfiles should be issued with at least arguments for the application and cube name:

The file type (csc, rul, txt, msh, xls, xlsx, xlsm, xml, zip, csv) can be included as an additional argument…

…although the file types is a fixed list – for example, you don’t seem to be able to use a wild card to pick up all spreadsheet files.

Whilst there is an Upload (and Download) facility, there does not seem to be the means to delete a remote file…which is a bit of an inconvenience, because using Upload to upload a file that already exists results in an error, and there is no overwrite option. The dataload.txt and dataload.rul files previously uploaded via the OAC front end were therefore manually deleted via OAC, and verified using Listfiles.

The files were then uploaded back to OAC using the Upload option of EssCS:

As you would expect, the files will then appear both in a Listfiles command and via OAC:

Note that the file list in OAC does not refresh with a browser page refresh or any ‘sort’ operation: use Refresh under Actions as above.

With the files now re-uploaded, the data can be loaded. EssCS also contains a DataLoad command, but unfortunately there appears to be no means to specify a rules file – meaning it would seem to be confined to overwrite, ‘export data’ style imports only:

A good point here is that the a DataLoad EssCS command makes an entry to the Jobs table, so success / record counts can be confirmed:

Summary

The post details three methods of loading data to Essbase under OAC:

  • Via the formatted template spreadsheet (on import or from Cube Designer)
  • Via the Command Line Interface
  • Via the Jobs facility of OAC

There are some minor differences between them, which may affect which you may wish to use for any particular scenario.

Arguably, given the availability of MAXL, there is a further custom method available as the actual data load can be effected that way too. This will be explored further in the next post that will start to consider how these tools might be used for real scenarios.

OAC: Essbase and DVCS

Finally managed to get around to having a proper look at Essbase within Oracle Analytics Cloud Service (OAC) after a busy couple of months. This post focusses mainly on initial impressions on the ‘out of the box’ the Essbase side of this - which we will explore in more detail in future posts, as well as more detail on the use of Essbase with DVCS.

Using Essbase with DVCS

One of the features we are keen to explore more in this context is the integration of Essbase and the Data Visualisation Cloud Service (DVCS). One point that we found that we do not think is being expressed clearly anywhere else we have seen is how to configure this: In setting up our OAC instance, we were having difficulty coming up with a combination of configuration selections that enables Essbase and DV to work at the same time.

Oracle documentation (such as the price list) suggest that both should be available within Standard Edition OAC:

But Doc ID 2265410.1 on MoS suggests, by needing to add a security rule to the Essbase OAC, that two OAC instances are required. We could not find any reference to this requirement in Oracle documentation or blogs on the subject, but it transpires after checking with Oracle that this is indeed the case – Essbase and DV need to be on separate OAC instances.

Essbase

Looking purely at Essbase, my initial reaction is very positive…whilst the interface is different (I am sure tears will be shed for EAS & Studio in the foreseeable future…although given the way some stalwarts are still clinging on the last surviving copies of the Excel Add In, maybe not too imminently), once the surface of the new interface is scratched more...ahem…’seasoned’ developers will take comfort from being able to do a lot of the same things as they currently can. I am also confident it will fulfil one of the stated objectives in making it easier for non-experts to be able quickly and easily deploy cubes for analysis purposes.

Whilst the manual application and cube maintenance tools through the OAC front-end seem resilient and work effectively, I think some aspects will be difficult to use as the primary maintenance method in a production system - the ‘breadcrumb’ method afforded to dimension maintenance in particular will start to get fiddly to use with a dimension of any sort of volume. The application and cube Import (from a formatted Excel spreadsheet) facility is great - to my mind, a bit like a supercharged and easier-to-use Outline Load Utility in Hyperion Planning - and the ability to refresh the spreadsheet from a deployed cube is a good feature that shouldn’t have been taken for granted. I know Excel is regarded as the Devil’s work in some BI quarters…I personally don’t feel that way until it is being used as a database (or as some form of primary data storage)…but in this context, it is quick & easy to use, on most people’s desktops straightway, and is intuitive.

Still in the Excel corner, on the Smartview side, the addition of the Cube Designer extension (requiring Smartview 11.1.2.5.700) to be able to consider & change the more generic aspects (not members) of the ‘cube maintenance’ spreadsheets is a nice touch that makes this more straightforward and removes the need to pay strict attention to the spreadsheet layout. The ‘treeview’ style hierarchy viewer also helps make sense of the parent-child members that need to be detailed on the individual dimension tabs.

One issue that has flitted across my mind at this early stage is that of rules files. Whilst the Import facility creates these for you (as with creating a cube from Essbase Studio) which is welcome, and rules files created in an on-prem system can be uploaded (again, welcome), the on-board rules file editor is text based:

I’m not too sure how many people have created or edited rules files like this before (although I’d hazard a guess), but whilst the presence of any means to create, amend, or even tweak a file is good, it remains to be seen how usable this approach is. The alternative is to resubmit from the maintenance spreadsheet thus getting it created / amended for you or to maintain in on-prem system…but seeing as this platform is an alternative to (rather than an augmentation of) on prem for a lot of people, I’m not sure how practical this is.

Whilst the existing tools look really promising, I can’t help but think there will be occasions going forwards where it might be advantageous to be able to create a rules file to run an uploaded file outside of them: time will tell.

The Command Line Tool (downloadable from OAC-Essbase / Utilities) is a little limited at the moment, but goes some way towards filling the potential gap left by the absence of client-side EssMsh and can only grow with further releases: from the Oracle OAC documentation...

In conclusion, first impressions are very favourable. There are changes (eg Security), new features (eg Sandboxing), and I am sure there will be gaps for those considering moving from existing on-prem applications - for example, as I have seen someone else reference, there does not seem to be any reference to partitions in the front end or the import spreadsheet layout - so whilst there is a lot with which we will quite quickly feel familiar, there are also going to be new areas and new practices for us to get into step with: as above, we will look to explore some of these in future posts.